Archives - March, 2019



13 Mar 19

Groovin the Moo 2017 line-up announced Golden Features PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL
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Picture: NICK BIELBY

Boy and Bear PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Boy and Bear PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Danny Brown. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Danny Brown. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Danny Brown. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

The Rubens PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

The Rubens PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

The Rubens PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Shelby Craig of New Lambton and Sophie O’Brien of New Lambton PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Elizabeth Banney and Simon Strath of Nelson Bay. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Twenty One Pilots. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Twenty One Pilots. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Calvin Vidigal and Tayla Craig of Sydney. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Calvin Vidigal and Tayla Craig of Sydney. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Aiden Gazi and Shannon Jennings of Penrith. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Abbey Mesnforth of Glen Valley and Jess Wells of Eleebana. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Abbey Mesnforth of Glen Valley. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Monique Cooper of Singleton and Tenille Oliver of Rutherford. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Emira Harris, Reiana Murphy and Shannon Motley all of Forster. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Monique Cooper of Singleton and Tenille Oliver of Rutherford. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

A light rain shower sends everyone running for cover. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

A light rain shower sends everyone running for cover. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

A light rain shower sends everyone running for cover. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

osh Lamb of Nelson Bay. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Rhea Ashton of Scotts Head and Riley O’Keefe of Coffs Harbour. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Rhea Ashton of Scotts Head and Riley O’Keefe of Coffs Harbour. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Skye Allen of Port Macquarie, Briony Lane and Blake Clarke of Forster. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Miles of smiles at Groovin The Moo Maitland. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Fans watching British India. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Fans watching British India. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Fans watching British India. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

British India performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

British India performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

British India performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Blinged up for Groovin the Moo Maitland 2016. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Safia performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Safia performs. PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

PHOTO BY MARINA NEIL

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

Picture: NICK BIELBY

TweetFacebookAgainst Me!Amy SharkARCHITECTSAlldayThe DarknessDillon FrancisGeorge MapleHayden JamesThe Jungle GiantsK.FlayL-FRESH The LIONLoyle CarnerMETHYL ETHELMilky ChanceMontaigneNortheast Party HouseSLUMBERJACKThe Smith Street BandSnakehipsTash SultanaThundamentalsThe WombatsViolent SohoThe Maitland Groovin the Moo is on April 29. Tickets go on sale Tuesday February 7.

Groovin The Moo had previously announced that rapperD.R.A.M. would be playingthis year’s event, but he has since pulled out.


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13 Mar 19

FINE REPUTATION: The Tolley sisters, Ang (left) and Bec (right) with the Penley Estate winemaker Kate Goodman.COONAWARRA’S Penley Estate is notable among n wine companies by being run by three women and by its fascinating skein of family ties.
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The women are owners Alexandra and Rebecca Tolley, known as Ang and Bec, and acclaimed former Punt Road Yarra Valley winemaker Kate Goodman.

Kate had helped establish Punt Road winery in 2001 after honing her skills at Wirra Wirra in McLaren Vale, Tim Knappstein in the Clare Valley and Seppelt at Great Western and signed on as Penley winemaker in January 2016.

Penley Estate was established in 1988 and its name harks back 60 years to the union of the South n wine pioneer Penfold and Tolley families.

The union was forged when Reginald Lester Tolley and Judith Anne Penfold Hyland married in 1947 and the Penley wine venture was born in 1988 when Reginald’s and Judith’s winemaker son Kym Tolley and Ang and Bec bought land at Coonawarra, planted grapes and later built a winery.With Kym at the winery helm, the wines built a fine reputation. In 2015, however, Kym retired and Ang and Bec took full ownership of Penley.

They saw ownership of the estate as emulating inspirational female forebears like Mary Penfold and Gladys Penfold Hyland.In 1870 Mary Penfold took over the running of the growing family wine business after the death of her husband.Gladys, the wife of Penfolds chairman Frank Penfold Hyland, took charge of the company after her husband’s death and chaired the board from 1948 to 1961.The great granddaughter of colonial Governor Philip Gidley King, she remained a Penfolds director until 1964.

Ang and Bec add another layer of family fusion because Ang is the wife of viticulturist David Paxton, the owner of McLaren Vale’s Paxton Wines, and mother of two sons Bec is the partner of Mark Maxwell, owner-winemaker of Maxwell Wines at McLaren Vale.

The Penfold Hyland and Tolley families have rich history, with the Penfolds wine saga dating back to 1844, when immigrant English medico Christopher Rawson Penfold and his wife Mary planted wine grapes at Magill. The Penfolds’ daughter Georgina married Thomas Hyland and control of the wine venture passed to them and later to their sons, who changed their surnames to Penfold Hyland in honour of their grandfather.The less familiar Tolley story dates back to 1888 when brothers Ernest and DouglasTolley helped establish the SA Tolley Scott and Tolley distillery and the family went on the play major roles in the Tollana and Tolley wine brands.


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13 Mar 19

Tensions erupt around Wickham high rise | photos, video FIRED UP: Bank Corner manager Monique Lee and Metro Cycles owner Bernie Hockings outside the construction site in Wickham. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
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COUNTING THE COST: Bernie Hockings estimates the Basebuild site has cost his business Metro Cycles around $30,000 in lost trade, from “dust tornadoes”, noise and loss of parking. He warned Hunter Street traders to expect a similar “hell” in coming years. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

FRUSTRATED: Manger of Bank Corner Cafe, Monique Lee, says dust storms along Bellevue Street from a nearby construction site have been costing her customers. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Workers pump sewage out of the ground outside Metro Cycles. Picture: Supplied.

A procession of trucks block Beresford Street in Wickham. Picture: Supplied.

A procession of trucks block Beresford Street in Wickham. Picture: Supplied.

ON PATROL: A parking inspector headed towards a car parked in a ‘no stopping’ zone, despite the loss of as many as two-thirds of the spaces in the area. Picture: Supplied

A procession of trucks block Beresford Street in Wickham. Picture: Supplied.

TweetFacebook Building site battleground IT’S the $36million project that has turned atiny inner city laneway into a battleground.

The construction of the Huxley Apartments in Wickham has driven neighbours to despair, sparkedlegal battles and even physical clashes between the builder and union officials.

Angry businesses and residents surrounding the building site on Beresford Street say they’ve been pushed to the brink by “tornadoes” of dust, noise and road closures during the 16-month construction of the eight-storey, 64-apartment development.

But the Floraville-based construction company – Basebuild – has defended its actions, saying the problems are part of the“growing pains” of the city.

The project is expected to be completed this month;just as two union officials face court over an on-site altercation last year.

The representatives of theConstruction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) attendedthe worksite after being alerted to safety issues by workers.

There was a heated confrontation when the site manager objected to them conducting a spot inspection, before he wasallegedly assaulted by the officials.

CFMEU Newcastle office coordinator Peter Harris said the union was escorted by police and Workcover officialson a subsequent inspection of the site, which saw several breaches of workplace health and safety laws uncovered.

“Police had a concern over the potential for [another]…physical altercation,” Mr Harris said.

He said the union disputed the builder’sversion of events andplanned to defend the actions of itsofficials in court.

“If we get complaints about site safety, we’ve got a legal obligation and a right to conduct an inspection of the site. We’re not required to give anybody notice.”

A SafeWork NSW spokesperson would not respond directly to questions about the company, butsaid it attended a construction site on Beresford Street in February 2016 and issued improvement notices in relation to falls from heights, scaffolding and electrical safety.

“These notices have been complied with,” she said.

“SafeWork NSW also visited the site on several occasions in late 2016 as part of a high risk construction safety project. No work health and safety issues were identified.”

Managing director of BasebuildScott Shafrendescribed the issues raised as “minor” and said all were “acted on and rectified immediately.”

He declined to comment on the alleged assault of his site manager while the matter was before the courts.

But the company is still at loggerheads with neighbouring businesses – Metro Cycles and Bank Corner Cafe on Bellevue Street –who claim itsoperations have nearly driven them out of business.

They say they have been forced to contend with “dust storms” coming down the street andconstruction noise at 80 to 90 decibels in the middle of the day.

FRUSTRATED: Manger of Bank Corner Cafe, Monique Lee, says dust storms along Bellevue Street from a nearby construction site have been costing her customers. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

“The dust gets all over thetables, it’s a health hazard,” said Monique Lee, the manager of Bank Corner Cafe.

At least one resident was forced to move his family out of the neighbouring Cove Apartments when his son became ill because of the constant dust from the demolition works.

“He suffered allergies and was sick for months, he had to take medication,” Martin Simon said, saying his son had recovered since moving away from the building site.

“Then when the apartments were builtyou looked outthe window and you looked directly into someone’s bathroom. For the life of me I can’t understand how they were approved.”

Mr Shafren acknowledged that jack hammering had occurred but said it was conducted in “accordance with acceptable work practice” and within the council-approved hours.

He said that “all reasonable measures” were taken to control the effects of inground works and dust.

“We werevery unfortunate to experience some extreme weather events during this phase of construction,” he said.

The construction siteresulted in the loss oftwo-thirds of the parking spaces in the area“almost overnight”according to the owner of Metro Cycles Bernie Hockings, and he estimates there have been nearly 100 full or partial road closures.

“If people can’t get here, the first time they go ‘I’ll try again,’” Mr Hockingssaid.

“The second time, they go ‘that was a pity’ and the third time they don’t bother coming here again.

COUNTING THE COST: Bernie Hockings estimates the Basebuild site has cost his business Metro Cycles around $30,000 in lost trade, from “dust tornadoes”, noise and loss of parking. He warned Hunter Street traders to expect a similar “hell” in coming years. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

“The workers used to get here at 6.30 in the morning and put witches hats out to reserve more of the parking spaces. It was outrageous.”

Mr Shafren said the tradesmen were encouraged to car pool and to park in the larger council-approved parking areas to reduce the pressure on on-streetparks, which workers could not use for long periods anyway due to the timing restrictions.

He said they had council approval to usepart of the road for aconstruction zone and an area adjacent to the old Wickham station, where the witches hats were positioned.

“It would be impossible to build anything if we didn’t have this area,” Mr Shafren said.

ButMr Hockings said that while he was not opposed to development nearby, theconstruction works had cost him an estimated $30,000 in lost trade, and that was too high a price to pay.

“I know you have to break eggs to make an omelet, and I knew this was a developing area when I moved here,” he said. “But I also assumed there would be a compromise where the construction would be well managed.”

He said his bikes had been devalued because they were covered in sand and dust and he had seen declining numbers of people in the shop –until the construction workers knocked off for Christmas, and they “exploded” with customers.

“When you’re selling a brand new $3000 bike and it’s covered in dust, the best you can do is say‘sorry, it’s a display model, I’ll knock five or 10 per cent off’.

“People used to come in here and spend half-an-hour picking a bike, but if the environment gets trashed and it’snoisy and dusty, they walk out after five minutes.”

A further strain on relations was a bungle in October 2015 when the workers accidentally pumped grout into a sewer main.

Hunter Water spent $373,000 replacing that section of the sewerand is still pursuing Basebuild’s insurer for costs through its lawyers.

Mr Hockings was unimpressed when he saw raw sewage pumped out of the ground outside his shop.

“You’re standing there talking to the customers about buying thousands of dollars worth of bikes and suddenly the shop was full of the smell of s***. I was embarrassed,” he said.

Mr Hocking claims in another instance, Beresford Lanebehind his shop –where prospective buyerstest ride their bikes –was dug up and not resealed.

“We just had a dirt road down there for three or four weeks. I finally got the council to make them do it and the workers were really angry.

“Now they are just belligerent, I don’t even ask them to do anything.”

Mr Shafren insisted that the contractors always intended to resurface the laneway.While he was sympathetic to the complaints of the surrounding businesses, he stressed it had been very challenging to construct a high-rise tower in such close proximity to other buildings.

“I am sorry that our shop operator feels so bitter about our building process as it is very hard to build a major construction in a built up area,” he said.

“We have at all times tried to minimise the disruptions to all surrounding business but it would be impossible to get the building built if some people had theirway.

“Call it ‘growing pains’but I hope his business and all others will benefit with another 100 residentsliving at his doorstep.

“This is also a bad time as whilst we are in our last month of completing construction another major project is now beginning.”

But Mr Hockings saidhis experience did not bode well for the retailersalong Hunter Street; ahead of a‘frenzy’ of buildingwork in coming years with the construction ofthe light rail and further high rise apartment blocks.

“It will be absolute hell for them,” he said.“The way it’s going wewon’t be here in two or three years time and someone else will get the benefit and we will have paid the price.”


Link Category: 苏州桑拿会所



13 Mar 19

Kasey fights for right to play country TweetFacebookDragonfly.
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She is also on a 10-datetour alongside Powderfinger frontman Bernard Fanning that will stop off in Bendigo later this month.

The real challenge, she said, was getting country music onto the public’splaylist.

“It’s probably been harder for me playing the style of music I play than anything to do with being a woman or being over 40,” Chambers said.

It took breakthrough singleNot Pretty Enough, a track about commercial radio’s reluctance to hit play on country music, to win mainstream affection.

But fans of the song have stuck by her ever since.

“They’ve all grown up with me, a lot of the girls who felt not pretty enough at the time,” she said.

“Now they’re 40-year-old women like me still having days when they feel not pretty enough, like we all do.”

Despite always returning to some of her first and favourite songs–a gig has never gone by without a rendition of The Captain –Chambers believes she is a better songwriter now than ever before.

“Everyone should feel like they’re doing their best work at this point in their life,” she said, pointingto album trackThe Ballad of Henri Youngas evidence of her maturing craft.

The song details the life of a pickpocket sent to Alcatraz, the same story as the 1995 Kevin Bacon film Murder in the First.

Despite seeing the movie as a teenager, it was decades before Chambers felt ready to put the story to music.

And yet many of her songs simply “fall out”, like lead single Ain’t No Little Girl.

“I like to think I have more control over them (the songs) than I do,” she said.

“But I’m glad some of the songs just write themselves.

“I don’t ever want songwriting to feel like a job.”

While still sounding deeply personal, pop culture references abound on Dragonfly –the autobiographical Talkin’ Baby Bluessomehow works Twisted Sister, The Sopranos and Kanye West into five minutes– as do nods to literatureand the Bible.

The references are a relic of a childhood spent in a “quite strict” Seventh Day Adventist familywhose musical diet was dominated bygospel-tinged country artists.

TodayChambers describesherself as a “believer of stuff”not affiliated with any particular religion. She said the liturgical lyrics were more style than substance.

“I like the way that language sounds in song, particularly in this style,” she said.

“I pick up a banjo and play it in a minor key and Ifeel like I just want to use biblical terms.”

The upcoming concert series will the be the first time fans hear some of the new songs live, but Chambers also promised audiences they would also witness duets between her and Fanning.

Their first show together was just last week at the Tamworth Country Music Festivalbut the pair already have a long history of singing on one another’s albums, most notably the titletrack of Chambers’ 10thstudio album, Bittersweet.

She has even released a cover of the Powderfinger hit These Days.

Chambers’ admiration for Fanning boils down to his artistic self-determination.

“I love Bernard’s approach to music, because he plays music for all the right reasons,” she said.

“He’s not dictated to by anyone else: trends, audiences.

“He’s just him and he ownsthat.”

Kasey Chambers and Bernard Fanning bring their Sooner orLater tour to Ulumbarra Theatre on February 18.Limited tickets still available.


Link Category: 苏州桑拿会所



13 Mar 19

Dump: Melville Ford last week. Picture: Marina NeilThe body charged with fighting illegal dumping in the Hunter says it can’t address severe littering atMelville Ford because it has not received a request from Maitland City Council.
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Fairfax Media reported last week that illegal dumpers had targeted Melville Ford recently, with items including a severed pig’s head, a burnt out car and other waste strewn across sections of the land.

The Hunter-Central Coast Regional Illegal Dumping Squad, based in Lake Macquarie, has been charged with fighting and reducing illegal dumping across the region, with councils across the Hunter having signed up to the RID Squad program.

But a RID Squad spokesperson told Fairfax Media this week that the body could not investigate the issue at Melville Ford, because it had not received a request for help from Maitland City Council.

“The Hunter-Central Coast Regional Illegal DumpingSquad has a two-tier membership structure with local councils,” the spokesperson said.

“Some councils have an Illegal Dumping Investigator based in their area, and for other councils, such as Maitland, the RID Squad assists the council in their investigation.

“To date, the RID squad has not received a request from Maitland City Council to assist in this matter.

“If a request for assistance is received from Maitland City Council, the RID squad can assist in investigations and compliance action, as well as providing assistance with education and appropriate deterrence measures.”

Council’sDevelopment andEnvironment manager David Simm said rangers were investigating.

WARNING: GALLERY CONTAINS GRAPHIC CONTENT

RID Squad needs invitation to investigate dumping | Photos Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Marina Neil

Picture: Supplied

Picture: Supplied

Picture: Supplied

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